Climate Justice Forum & Reception Bring Together Grassroots Groups, Leaders and Supporters at the Boston Public Library

By Christy Pardew | GreenRoots International

On May 10, hundreds of community members, climate justice supporters, and grassroots organizations gathered with Grassroots International and the Boston Public Library to share stories and hear words of wisdom from international Climate Justice leaders:

In the powerful Climate Justice Forum, speakers addressed our current political moment and how it impacts the struggle for climate justice, examples of Indigenous peoples’ resistance to the root causes of climate change, connections between migrant justice and climate change, and how climate issues affect rural communities in Brazil.  They emphasized how much grassroots organizing matters and how social movements create real solutions to the climate crisis. 

Tom Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network and Carlos Marentes, Sr. of La Via Campesina were two of the speakers at the Climate Justice Forum.

Moderator Sara Mersha of Grassroots International, author and speaker Naomi Klein, Indigenous Environmental Network’s Tom Goldtooth, La Via Campesina’s Carlos Marentes, Sr., Grassroots International’s Jovanna Garcia Soto and the Landless Workers’ Movement Jade Percassi.

Tom Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network and Carlos Marentes, Sr. of La Via Campesina were two of the speakers at the Climate Justice Forum.

Stay tuned for our ongoing conversations around Climate Justice and funding real solutions. Follow us here on our website, on Facebook or Twitter and with these hashtags: #GrassrootsClimateJustice and #FundClimateSolutions.

Watch the entire forum (the program starts about 22 minutes into the video):

Chelsea Marches on Washington

By Chelsea Record

Photos by Joe Prezioso

This past Friday, April 28, some 27 Chelsea residents boarded a bus at 10 p.m. to make thier way with Chelsea GreenRoots to Washington D.C., where they took part in the People's Climate March. 

Protesters Mark President Trump’s First 100 Days With Boston Common Rally

By Staff Member, CBS Broadcasting

Featured Speaker, GreenRoots Associate Director, Maria Belen Power at the People's Climate March in Boston, MA

Featured Speaker, GreenRoots Associate Director, Maria Belen Power at the People's Climate March in Boston, MA

BOSTON (CBS/AP) — Organizers of a rally on Boston Common say they’re marking President Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office by protesting his agenda so far.

The rally was part of a nationwide chain of protests designed to bring attention to what protesters say is the president’s weak environmental record.

Leaders of civic, political, and religious groups were all represented at the rally. Rally participant Rev. Mariama White-Hammond says the rally is to get Washington to pay attention.

“We believe that our politicians have to listen. So we believe that President Trump is changing his tune a little bit, so he’s started to understand how we the people want to protect our climate,” White-Hammond said.

“We want to leave a better planet for our grand kids. Who could be against that?” she said.

Rally participant Maria Belen Power said she was there to speak out for the less fortunate.

“We’re here speaking on behalf of the communities most affected by climate change. Those are low income communities of color,” Power said.

The rally began at noon on the common. Organizers included unions, local community groups, environmental groups, and religious and faith leaders.

Participants say they have one purpose–to send a clear signal to Washington that climate matters.

“We believe that the climate movement shouldn’t be just about emissions or solar panels,” White-Hammond said.

Power says the climate and justice issues affect Massachusetts residents.

“Chelsea is one of the most densely populated and diverse low-income communities in the Commonwealth. Yet we’re carrying some of the biggest environmental burdens in the region,” Power said.

Organizers pointed the fact that building solar panels and other renewable energy products can bring jobs to Massachusetts.