'Hit First And Worst': Region's Communities Of Color Brace For Climate Change Impacts

WBUR News by Shannon Dooling

The consequences of climate change, experts say, will disproportionately affect low-income communities and communities of color.

And those same communities often already are located among environmental hazards like trash incinerators, fuel storage tanks and the toxic remains that come with them.

Chelsea Creek is a designated port area. (Courtesy of Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management)

Chelsea Creek is a designated port area. (Courtesy of Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management)

PORT Park, in Chelsea, is located at the site of a former asphalt storage facility.

"Just on the other side of this beautiful park is Chelsea's neighborhood most impacted by environmental injustice," says Roseann Bongiovanni, executive director of the group GreenRoots. "So it's the lowest income, most ethnically diverse, most densely populated neighborhood in the entire city of Chelsea and the one that is located the closest to the environmental impacts."

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No Tropical Paradise: Urban 'Heat Islands' Are Hotbeds For Health Problems

WBUR News by Martha Bebinger

Part of a series examining the effects of climate change here in Massachusetts

This map of Greater Boston shows land surface temperatures on July 7, 2015. The redder areas are warmest. The map was created on July 3, 2017. (Courtesy of The Trust For Public Land mapping tool)

This map of Greater Boston shows land surface temperatures on July 7, 2015. The redder areas are warmest. The map was created on July 3, 2017. (Courtesy of The Trust For Public Land mapping tool)

CHELSEA, Mass. — As coastlines recede with global warming, so-called heat islands are growing. These are dense urban areas where cement or asphalt cover most of the ground, where multi-story buildings — often brick — bake in the sun, and where there are few trees.

Daily temperatures in these spots can be 20 to 50 degrees hotter than in leafy suburbs. For residents of these islands, health risks rise with the heat.

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Climate Justice Forum & Reception Bring Together Grassroots Groups, Leaders and Supporters at the Boston Public Library

By Christy Pardew | GreenRoots International

On May 10, hundreds of community members, climate justice supporters, and grassroots organizations gathered with Grassroots International and the Boston Public Library to share stories and hear words of wisdom from international Climate Justice leaders:

In the powerful Climate Justice Forum, speakers addressed our current political moment and how it impacts the struggle for climate justice, examples of Indigenous peoples’ resistance to the root causes of climate change, connections between migrant justice and climate change, and how climate issues affect rural communities in Brazil.  They emphasized how much grassroots organizing matters and how social movements create real solutions to the climate crisis. 

Tom Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network and Carlos Marentes, Sr. of La Via Campesina were two of the speakers at the Climate Justice Forum.

Moderator Sara Mersha of Grassroots International, author and speaker Naomi Klein, Indigenous Environmental Network’s Tom Goldtooth, La Via Campesina’s Carlos Marentes, Sr., Grassroots International’s Jovanna Garcia Soto and the Landless Workers’ Movement Jade Percassi.

Tom Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network and Carlos Marentes, Sr. of La Via Campesina were two of the speakers at the Climate Justice Forum.

Stay tuned for our ongoing conversations around Climate Justice and funding real solutions. Follow us here on our website, on Facebook or Twitter and with these hashtags: #GrassrootsClimateJustice and #FundClimateSolutions.

Watch the entire forum (the program starts about 22 minutes into the video):